Culture, Digital & Mobile, Interviews, Videos — July 9, 2012 at 6:37 pm

Tune In to Aweh TV and Qub TV

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“Video killed the radio star,” sang The Buggles in 1979 – an eerily accurate prediction, considering how online video and web TV sites have certainly exploded in popularity, overtaking traditional channels of music-sharing and discovery. For musical acts in Asia, the Internet is an obvious choice as a platform for showcasing their talent on the international stage, while video has proven to be one of the most captivating ways to present music, establishing a connection that mere listening fails to achieve. Melding the two together, web TV sites have sprouted over recent years to showcase the best-kept secrets of local and regional music to a wider audience.
Music Services Asia interviews two of the freshest web TV sites with a special focus on regional music and arts, Ollie Walker from Aweh TV (based in South Korea) and Tasya Maulana & Eric Liem from Qub TV, (based in Indonesia). Read on to find out more about what gives their content an edge, their future plans as well as their thoughts on local and South-East Asian music scenes.
 
 

 

Music Services Asia: What inspired you to create the concept behind Qub TV?

 Qub TV: At first, we just wanted catharsis from our daily job. We were discussing why there weren’t a lot of media exposing all interesting subcultures around us. So, we began capturing this phenomenon via web TV. We wanted to create something that reflected and expressed us, with a goal that in the future, QUBtv would be the symbol of the creative movement in Indonesia that could cross borders, genres and generation. We wanted to stand alongside our people in their daily lives and be part of the local movement.

How do the independent artists on your site benefit from being featured?

They’ll get more exposure, for sure! Also, since most of them have something creative to share, we try to provide for them. So, we also collaborate aside from just making videos. In the end, it’s mutual networking

The online world is saturated with millions of videos — what do you think can make a video stand out? How do you give the videos featured on your site an edge?

For now, we’re just trying to do what we can, which is create something good and hope that along the way, we can find our trademark. Anyway, it’s better than not making something, right?

What can we expect from your site in the months to come?

Definitely more shows–not only about music, but also, we’ll expose lot of unique, local
subcultures. We have a business plan for the future; we are going to have better quality in terms of videos and contents, although we know that it will take some time.

What are your thoughts on today’s music scene in South-East Asia and Asia? And how can bands and artists from South-East Asia gain more prominence globally?

It’s pretty great because of the Internet. And we think Asians have more unique cultures than the west–that’s the interesting part. But of course, it’s not enough just to make good art. Nowadays, artists need to reaize they need good promotion and marketing. You need to combine everything in one package.

Music Services Asia: What inspired you to create the concept behind Aweh TV?

Aweh TV: Aweh was inspired by the multi-talented individuals that surrounded us. We wanted to give back to our creative community, which spawned the idea of starting the initial blog.

How do the independent artists on your site benefit from being featured?

We know that our international readers appreciate the various and consistent contents and that they keep coming back for more. So, it’s evident that the artists we feature gain international exposure through the webzine.

The online world is saturated with millions of videos — what do you think can make a video stand out? How do you give the videos featured on your site an edge?

Yeah it is. I guess, it really just depends on the content and the way it is delivered. It also depends on who is viewing it and if you are reaching your kind of audience. Aweh is still in the initial blog phase, and we have been posting video features and experimenting with ideas for delivering content through the webzine in the future. With our revamp, which will be launched within a couple of months, we plan to dedicate an entire corner of the site to video. Within the video section, there will be Aweh-produced shows such as the I AM series and One Song With series, plus partner shows such as the Loose Union series. However, one aspect we are particularly excited about is showcasing videos from other production teams and videographers from around the world. We really want to get behind other projects such as indie dramas, documentaries and shows. There are a handful of things in the works, and we look forward to watching them develop.

What can we expect from your site in the months to come?

We will be revamping the site and expanding it in various ways. One of which is being the video side of things, like bringing more articles and creative writing into the mix. We will also be putting together regular competitions to encourage creativity through the site and help promote and market some indie brands. However, a major concern with the revamp is to reorganize and present the content in a more user-friendly manner. We recently teamed up with Claire Keet, who is a great designer. We all feel confident that the new site will make our readers very stoked.

What are your thoughts on today’s music scene in South-East Asia and Asia? And how can bands and artists from South-East Asia gain more prominence globally?

In South Korea, it’s busy. The bands are great! There’s a lot of energy. However, the scene needs more strength, and creating a sustainable subculture scene is what a lot of brands and bands are trying to do. Generally, in South-East Asia, there seems to be a high level of talent, but there just seems to be only little exposure, promotion and support for them. We would really like to help change that in our own little Aweh way. Through this project, we have been lucky enough to learn about a lot of bands, music and scenes that we previously didn’t know about, and so we hope to continue learning, sharing and giving back to the scene on a global level.